Obituaries



Jérôme Golmard
Former French player died on 1 August 2017 at the age of 43.

Golmard was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in January 2014, losing the use of his legs within a few weeks of the diagnosis. He established the 'Association Jérôme Golmard, Combattre la maladie de Charcot', which aimed to raise awareness and support those with the disease.

Born in Dijon on 9 September 1973, Golmard began his tennis career at the age of six and turned professional at the age of 17. He reached a career-high ranking of No. 22 in April 1999 and won two titles on the ATP Tour.

Golmard represented France on six occasions, making his debut in a 5-0 victory against Morocco in September 1995, with his last appearance in the competition coming in another 5-0 victory, against Austria in July 2000.

Golmard is survived by his two sons, aged 12 and 11.

Mervyn Rose
Seven-time Grand Slam champion Mervyn Rose died on 23 July at the age of 87.

The Australian lefthander won singles titles at the 1954 Australian Open and at 1958 Roland Garros, four Grand Slam doubles crowns, including two at the US Open, and one mixed doubles major.

Rose represented Australia in Davis Cup and was part of the Harry Hopman-captained victories over the United States in the finals in both 1951 and 1957.

After retiring from the game, Rose worked as a coach to some of the game’s greats, including Margaret Court, Billie Jean King and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario, and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 2001. 

Peter Doohan
Peter Doohan died on 22 July aged 56, just nine weeks after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

Dubbed the ‘Becker Wrecker’ after famously defeating two-time defending champion Boris Becker at Wimbledon in 1987 en route to the fourth round, Doohan reached a career-high ranking of No.43 in singles and was unbeaten in Davis Cup.

Doohan ranked as high as No. 15 in doubles, finishing runner-up alongside Laurie Warder at the 1987 Australian Open and winning five career titles in the team game.

Jacques Dorfmann
Jacques Dorfmann, former chair umpire and director of competitions at the French Tennis Federation (FFT), died on 13 July 2017 aged 84.

Dorfmann was best-known in France as the chair umpire for the famous 1983 men's singles final at Roland Garros, where home favourite Yannick Noah defeated Mats Wilander in straight sets.

Over the course of a 30-year career in officiating, he umpired more than 15,000 tennis matches, with his last major match as an official coming in the 1988 men's singles final at Roland Garros, where Wilander defeated another French star, Henri Leconte.

Mavis Hogg
Mavis Hogg, an inspirational figure in Irish tennis, died on 9 April aged 90 following a short illness. Hogg was the first female president of the Irish Lawn Tennis Association in the 1970s and later served as Tennis Ireland Secretary from 1985-1993.

Enrique Morea
Enrique Morea, a former player and five-time President of the Asociación Argentina de Tenis (AAT), passed away in March aged 92. Twice a semifinalist at Roland Garros in 1953 and 1954 during his playing days, Morea went on to become the only Honorary President of the AAT in 2014, having enjoyed a full and distinguished career in tennis. Not only a successful player, Morea was also a Davis Cup captain and referee, and later held high-level administration roles as both AAT President and ITF Vice President.

“Enrique will be remembered as one of the greats of our sport,” said ITF President David Haggerty. “He made enormous contributions to tennis, not only as a player, but also as an administrator for the sport in his native South America. He will be hugely missed by the tennis family.”

Bodo Nitsche
Bodo Nitsche, a former Seniors player and member of the ITF Seniors Committee, passed away on 18 February aged 78.

Nitsche was a member of the ITF Seniors Committee between 1987 and 2009, having ranked No. 1 in the world in Seniors competition during that time, first attaining the top spot in October 2003.

Nitsche compiled an impressive 372-94 win-loss record during his Seniors playing career, and played on the circuit as recently as January 2014, when he contested his last Seniors tour event at the European Senior Open in Austria.

John Shannon
John Shannon, President of Tennis Fiji from 2001-06, died after a short illness in February 2017.

Shannon was born in Belfast and emigrated to Australia in 1967. He moved to Fiji shortly after and worked in a number of roles before becoming involved in the Northern Tennis Club.

He was President of Tennis Fiji from 2001-06, before taking the role of Secretary at the same organisation from 2006 until his death.

In these roles, he worked closely alongside colleagues from across the region, including many from other National Associations and the Oceania Tennis Federation.  

David Smith, of the Oceania Tennis Federation, paid tribute to Shannon. "This is an enormous loss for Tennis Fiji. I have worked with John for 15 years and he has been the driving force in reviving the Fiji Open. A great colleague and even better person," he said.

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